Posted by: bbannan | April 10, 2009

Evidence of Design Thinking, in the use mobile devices and e-learning solutions – Knikki

As I searched the Internet for solutions that showed evidence of design thinking I came across two articles I wanted to highlight.

Bishop Gore School in Sketty raises pupil attendance with text message service (http://www.publictechnology.net/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=19532)
Article Summary
This school had an attendance problem. Students would leave the homes as if there were going to school but would never show up to school. They addressed this problem by using a system that would sent text messages to the parent if the student did not show up to school and would continue to send those messages until the parent responded.

My Thoughts
I can imagine a lot of creative/design thinking going on in the minds of the staff of how to address this problem. They found that communication to the parents was going to be key in improving the students’ attendance habits and they made that part of their solution. What excites be about the final solution is that they did not limit themselves to ordinary ineffective means in which to solve the problem. They leveraged mobile technologies as the solution, by sending quick and efficient means text messages to the parent.

Mobile e learning via phone achieves real success with the young
(http://www.publictechnology.net/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=2869)
Article Summary
This report presents some innovative ideas on how mobile technologies, such as smart phones and PDAs (Personal Digital Assistants) can be useful learning aids – particularly with young people who have not succeeded through traditional education.

A few findings from the report
It helped engage young people who have been put off by traditional education methods.
It helped to remove some of the formality from the learning experience and engage reluctant learner.

My thoughts
Based on previous conversations in the 730 and 752 class the negatives of using mobile devices for e learning seems to be well thought out. I challenge us to look beyond the limitations of small mobile devices and brainstorm ways in which we can leverage these technologies in a useful way, such as the examples mentioned above. The key to both of these solutions was user research determining the everyday technology uses, user needs, understanding the problem, creative thinking and determining the best means of getting this information to intended group.

Advertisements

Responses

  1. […] See more here: Evidence of Design Thinking, in the use mobile devices and e … […]

  2. This is good information. I’m glad I found it. Thank you for providing this. I provide professional web design services and solutions and can relate.

  3. I believe it was the SALT web site where I saw an article stating that Bb learning will now be available on mobile devices. Unfortunately I cannot find the article. But when looking I came across another one. The newest version of Wimba will allow, “instructors the power to distribute MP4 files, featuring digital audio and digital video streams of lectures and discussions, to course management systems (CMS), YouTube, iTunes University, Facebook, or other content management systems. Students gain tremendous flexibility in accessing content online or offline, from not only their computers but from their iPod, iPhone, or other MP4 players. Providing content for review anytime, anyplace, irrespective of a student’s location, is no longer an option but required to effectively engage and retain 21st century learners.”

    It looks like this is going to be an ongoing trend especially now that many kids will not and do not go anywhere without their cell phone or iPods and probably text more than they talk. Providing learning on mobile devices seems the next logical step, especially now many younger generations are getting used to learning from computers and media instead of books.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: